CHICK LIT & MOM LIT


Commercial women's fiction has always been one of publishing's most popular genres with readers, but when "Bridget Jones's Diary" by Helen Fielding was published in 1996, it almost single-handedly defined a new sub-category of fiction targeted to young women that soon became known as Chick Lit.

Typically, chick lit books feature single 20-to-30-something city-dwelling professionals who are struggling to figure out their careers and love lives ... not necessarily in that order. The usually sassy, clever and plucky heroines have the requisite quirky sidekicks, an arch nemesis in the form of a boss or an ex's ex and often two love interests: the good guy she should want and the bad boy she does want (and probably already has).

Soon writers were plumbing all aspects of the young urban woman's life: sex and relationships with Candace Bushnell's "Sex and the City," career and the fashion magazine business with Lauren Weisberger's "The Devil Wears Prada" and family ties with Jennifer Weiner's "In Her Shoes."

It was in this genre that Gigi Levangie Grazer found her opportunity: as a true Hollywood Insider, Grazer was able to corner the market on chick lit Hollywood Style, with her first two novels, Rescue Me and Maneater.

The meteoric rise in popularity of chick lit has recently spurred the creation of a sub-genre called Mom Lit. Mom lit often features the same kind of spirited young woman who would've been -- or even literally was in an earlier sequel -- a chick lit heroine to see what happens after she gets the guy...and the house, and the career and most importantly, the baby.



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